<![CDATA[HASRIZAL.CO - Blog]]>Wed, 02 Oct 2019 20:08:15 +0300Weebly<![CDATA[Quality Instruction: My Kid's Experience]]>Wed, 03 Oct 2018 14:43:47 GMThttp://hasrizal.co/blog/quality-instruction-my-kids-experience"Thank you for coming. After one month schooling, I want to share with you some feedback regarding your kid," Sam said.

"Thank you for arranging the session and having me today," I replied.

"I found your kid struggle in Mathematics but at the same time, very strong in Arts, " Sam showed me some notes she made about my kid's learning progress.

"Yes, that is very true. I didn't mention anything to you and somehow was hoping that you will discover it at one point," I said.

"So, I will use the strength to overcome the challenge. I will use more Arts to explain Mathematical concepts to your kid. That might help your kid to sense the logic easier and faster!" Sam shared her strategy to assist my kid.

I was speechless.
I will use more Arts to explain Mathematical concepts to your kid.
QUALITY INSTRUCTION

The conversation I had with Sam about a year ago reminds me to what Michael Fullan says in his book:

"... 
Quality instruction requires getting a small number of practices right. These practices involve knowing clearly and specifically what each student can or cannot do, followed by tailored intervention that engages students in the particular learning in question, and then doing the assessment-instruction-correction process on a continuous basis...

... In systems that go, strategies focus on and drill down to effective instructional practices so that all teachers, individually and collectively, become better at what they are doing while they continue to seek even better methods.

This is the domain of expertise that John Hattie (2009) is getting at in his synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses of teaching practices related to student engagement and achievement.

High-impact strategies such as structured feedback to students, reciprocal teaching (teaching students to learn cognitive strategies to facilitate their own learning), and observation and feedback on ones' own teaching all had high impact on student learning.

Hattie tells us that the critical change agents are:
  1. Knowledge and skills
  2. A plan of action
  3. Strategies to overcome setbacks
  4. A high sense of confidence
  5. Monitoring progress
  6. A commitment to achieve
  7. Social and environment support
  8. Freedom, control, or choice

To me, Sam is an excellent example of a teacher that learns to become a professional exactly along the lines that Hattie is talking about - engaging in specific, precise, evidence-based, high-yield instructional practices. She is learning this because she is part of a comprehensive collective-capacity enterprise [1].

I would say, it is the ingredient Finnish education is benefiting from. The trust the system has with the teachers, and how autonomy is fully utilised, is when the teacher training program managed to instil both the purpose, and mastery.
A year after my kid attending the school here in Oulu, Finland, Mathematics is no longer a struggle. Few weeks ago, the teacher gave my kid a homework for English literature lesson, "write a love story using Mathematics!"

Super awesome!

Hasrizal
Oulu, Finland

[1] Fullan, Michael. All Systems Go: The Change Imperative for Whole System Reform (Kindle Locations 324-326). SAGE Publications. Kindle Edition. 
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<![CDATA[Visiting 'Future Schools' Around Oulu]]>Mon, 01 Oct 2018 21:00:00 GMThttp://hasrizal.co/blog/visiting-future-schools-around-ouluLearning in the 21st century is no longer compounded of what happened within the classroom’s wall.
The traditional idea of education and schooling served well the needs of the industrial society, but current and future life demands learning to concentrate on the holistic wellbeing of learners, reducing the separation between life in schools and home.
Changing operational culture as well as the pedagogical culture is hard, but the manipulation of architecture and interior design of learning spaces is another way to enhance changes.
These future schools demonstrate how pedagogy, leadership, capacity building, technology, teacher training and the architecture of the learning space are brought into action.
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<![CDATA[Interactive Reading for Web Pages]]>Sat, 31 Mar 2018 21:00:00 GMThttp://hasrizal.co/blog/interactive-reading-for-web-pages
If you own an iPad Pro and the Apple Pencil, or any models of iPad and stylus including your own finger, you can read articles more effectively.
On Safari browser, convert the article into pdf, then export the file to Notability. In Notability, you can highlight, make notes, basically interact with the text.  I created this tutorial video using iPad Pro, Apple Pencil, Keynote, Notability and Viva Video Pro.
Ebooks are not the replacement for printed books. They come to serve specific needs which are not necessarily similar to the reasons why people read printed books. Reading digital materials requires us to become active readers, interacting with the text and not simply reading it passively. Otherwise, we will find our selves flying all over the place not knowing what we read because the mind tends to ‘scan’ rather than ‘read’.
Hasrizal
Oulu FI
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<![CDATA[Teachers as the Experts in Designing Learning Activities]]>Tue, 06 Mar 2018 22:00:00 GMThttp://hasrizal.co/blog/teachers-as-the-experts-in-designing-learning-activities“I am sorry because I feel like I am using you to cover my weakness,” the teacher said.

“No, you shouldn’t see it that way. You are doing something that all teachers should do.

​Last year, one of the teachers from my school back home in Malaysia asked me a favour. She invited me to share my thoughts with her students in the history class she is in charge. They were discussing “the importance of awareness in the nation building”.
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I was even more than happy.

I miss teaching.

I miss the interaction with students.

We conducted the class via Skype at 4am (Finland time), to meet the Malaysian 10 o’clock in the morning. I made use the session to discuss with the students about the differences between the terms ‘badawi’ and ‘madani’ to understand the basic idea of civilisation.

It was followed by another session to discuss “how democracy is compatible with Islam”. Based on The Economist Intelligence Unit’s Democracy Index, we challenged the students to investigate why so many Muslim countries (including our country, Malaysia) scored lower than many ‘western countries’ especially from the Scandinavia?

The teacher felt she took the ‘easier’ way by assigning me to talk about a topic that she felt she’s not familiar with.

I emphasised that she was, in fact, doing what all teachers should do when we genuinely embrace the framework of 21st-century education. Teachers should not tide themselves to the idea of being the content experts. Students nowadays are no longer rely on teachers to know. Information is everywhere. The internet is available 24/7. Teachers now are more needed to act as the experts in designing the learning activities. And one of them is to identify someone, somebody, something, beyond the classroom, that is believed to be useful for the students, and connect the source with the learning activities.
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The teacher was not only discussing with me about the subject. She also shared her opinion regarding the students’ previous knowledge, their strengths and weaknesses, to make me aware of my audience beforehand. Those are the essential parts of a good pedagogical script in designing technology-enhanced learning (TEL).

She also discussed with me about technological aspects; such as the backup plan if Google Hangout doesn’t work, and how the whole plan can be moved smoothly to Skype. Those are the technological script! Among the technological script’s contents, she highlighted the text chatting function so that students can ask questions at any time during my presentation.

The teacher even planned how the students can produce vlog after the session as her method to evaluate the students’ understanding and ability to analyse and making connections. She guided the students to communicate their understanding.

​All those plans are invaluable and important for current understanding and needs in learning.

TEL: The Importance of Awareness in the Nation Building from Hasrizal Abdul Jamil on Vimeo.

A technology-enhanced learning session between me (in Finland) and students from Khalifah Model School (Secondary) in Malaysia to for the history subject conducted by Teacher Nur Qurratul Ain Bt Hamzah

When teachers successfully escape from the notion of being the ‘content experts’, they will move forward to create more progressive learning activities, benefitting all the resources available around. This is what we need. This is what the students need.

I am 9000km away, but I am very excited about what the teacher did. The school is evidently moving towards a better idea of what an education should be.

Congratulations.

​HASRIZAL
Oulu, FI
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